某篇文章

S1

All right, I want to see a show of hands: how many of you have
unfriended someone on Facebook because they said something offensive
about politics or religion, childcare, food?

这篇TED非常棒!有好多经典的句子。

All right, I want to see a show of hands:

Y-you’re like hitler,but even Hitler cared about Germany or something.

(Laughter)

0:11

how many of you have
unfriended someone on Facebook

-Rick,what about the reality we left behind? -What about the reality
Hitler cured cancer,Marty?The answer is don’t think about it.

And how many of you know at least one person that you avoid because you
just don’t want to talk to them?

All right, I want to see a show of hands: how many of you have
unfriended someone on Facebook because they said something offensive
about politics or religion, childcare, food?

because they said something offensive
about politics or religion,

Life is effort.I’ll stop when I die!

(Laughter)

0:22

childcare, food?

Well,we can’t all be raised like reptiles by a mentally ill scientist.

You know, it used to be that in order to have a polite conversation, we
just had to follow the advice of Henry Higgins in “My Fair Lady”: Stick
to the weather and your health. But these days, with climate change and
anti-vaxxing, those subjects —

(Laughter)

(Laughter)

-Obviously,at some point,the Gazorpians became so evolved that they
replaced females with birthing machines.The resultant lack of
distraction and hen-pecking allowed them to focus entirely on war,so
they bombed themselves back to the Stone Age,and now they just fight
with each other over fake [Bleep] with sticks and rocks all day long.
-You think it’s efficient to get rig of woman? -You ever see a line for
the men’s room?

(Laughter)

0:24

And how many of you
know at least one person that you avoid

Oh, I get it. The old behind-every-great-man Amazon twist.

are not safe either. So this world that we live in, this world in which
every conversation has the potential to devolve into an argument, where
our politicians can’t speak to one another and where even the most
trivial of issues have someone fighting both passionately for it and
against it, it’s not normal. Pew Research did a study of 10,000 American
adults, and they found that at this moment, we are more polarized, we
are more divided, than we ever have been in history. We’re less likely
to compromise, which means we’re not listening to each other. And we
make decisions about where to live, who to marry and even who our
friends are going to be, based on what we already believe. Again, that
means we’re not listening to each other. A conversation requires a
balance between talking and listening, and somewhere along the way, we
lost that balance.

And how many of you know at least one person that you avoid because you
just don’t want to talk to them?

because you just don’t want
to talk to them?

My life has been a lie! God is dead! The government’s lame! Thanksgiving
is about killing Indians! Jesus wasn’t born on Christmas! They moved the
date! It was a pagan holiday!

Now, part of that is due to technology. The smartphones that you all
either have in your hands or close enough that you could grab them
really quickly. According to Pew Research, about a third of American
teenagers send more than a hundred texts a day. And many of them, almost
most of them, are more likely to text their friends than they are to
talk to them face to face. There’s this great piece in The Atlantic. It
was written by a high school teacher named Paul Barnwell. And he gave
his kids a communication project. He wanted to teach them how to speak
on a specific subject without using notes. And he said this: “I came to
realize…”

0:29

(Laughter)

No. I’d say,given what we’ve been through,that I was right the whole
time and any epiphanies about gender politics were a projection of your
feminine insecurity.

(Laughter)

(Laughter)

You know, it used to be that in order
to have a polite conversation,

This microscope reveals things beyond comprehension.

“I came to realize that conversational competence might be the single
most overlooked skill we fail to teach. Kids spend hours each day
engaging with ideas and each other through screens, but rarely do they
have an opportunity to hone their interpersonal communications skills.
It might sound like a funny question, but we have to ask ourselves: Is
there any 21st-century skill more important than being able to sustain
coherent, confident conversation?”

0:31

we just had to follow the advice
of Henry Higgins in “My Fair Lady”:

The young eat the old if you let them,Jerry.

Now, I make my living talking to people: Nobel Prize winners, truck
drivers, billionaires, kindergarten teachers, heads of state, plumbers.
I talk to people that I like. I talk to people that I don’t like. I talk
to some people that I disagree with deeply on a personal level. But I
still have a great conversation with them. So I’d like to spend the next
10 minutes or so teaching you how to talk and how to listen.

You know, it used to be that in order to have a polite conversation, we
just had to follow the advice of Henry Higgins in “My Fair Lady”: Stick
to the weather and your health. But these days, with climate change and
anti-vaxxing, those subjects —

Stick to the weather and your health.

I was zuckerberging people before Zuckerberg’s balls dropped.

Many of you have already heard a lot of advice on this, things like look
the person in the eye, think of interesting topics to discuss in
advance, look, nod and smile to show that you’re paying attention,
repeat back what you just heard or summarize it. So I want you to forget
all of that. It is crap.

0:43

But these days, with climate change
and anti-vaxxing, those subjects —

That’s…humbling and flattering.

(Laughter)

(Laughter)

(Laughter)

And that’s how I took my storefront into the forefront of the (up)?
front.

There is no reason to learn how to show you’re paying attention if you
are in fact paying attention.

0:45

are not safe either.

So,as they say in Canada,pace oot!

(Laughter)

are not safe either. So this world that we live in, this world in which
every conversation has the potential to devolve into an argument, where
our politicians can’t speak to one another and where even the most
trivial of issues have someone fighting both passionately for it and
against it, it’s not normal. Pew Research did a study of 10,000 American
adults, and they found that at this moment, we are more polarized, we
are more divided, than we ever have been in history. We’re less likely
to compromise, which means we’re not listening to each other. And we
make decisions about where to live, who to marry and even who our
friends are going to be, based on what we already believe. Again, that
means we’re not listening to each other. A conversation requires a
balance between talking and listening, and somewhere along the way, we
lost that balance.

So this world that we live in,

Well,La-di-da.

(Applause)

1:34

this world in which every conversation

Pride cometh before the fall.

Now, I actually use the exact same skills as a professional interviewer
that I do in regular life. So, I’m going to teach you how to interview
people, and that’s actually going to help you learn how to be better
conversationalists. Learn to have a conversation without wasting your
time, without getting bored, and, please God, without offending anybody.

Now, part of that is due to technology. The smartphones that you all
either have in your hands or close enough that you could grab them
really quickly. According to Pew Research, about a third of American
teenagers send more than a hundred texts a day. And many of them, almost
most of them, are more likely to text their friends than they are to
talk to them face to face. There’s this great piece in The Atlantic. It
was written by a high school teacher named Paul Barnwell. And he gave
his kids a communication project. He wanted to teach them how to speak
on a specific subject without using notes. And he said this: “I came to
realize…”

has the potential
to devolve into an argument,

Listen,you have my words as a caregiver.

We’ve all had really great conversations. We’ve had them before. We know
what it’s like. The kind of conversation where you walk away feeling
engaged and inspired, or where you feel like you’ve made a real
connection or you’ve been perfectly understood. There is no reason why
most of your interactions can’t be like that.

2:07

where our politicians
can’t speak to one another

It’s like the N-word and the C-word had a baby and it was raised by all
the bad words for Jews.

So I have 10 basic rules. I’m going to walk you through all of them, but
honestly, if you just choose one of them and master it, you’ll already
enjoy better conversations.

(Laughter)

and where even the most trivial of issues

To get wriggledy wriggedy wrecked,son!

Number one: Don’t multitask. And I don’t mean just set down your cell
phone or your tablet or your car keys or whatever is in your hand. I
mean, be present. Be in that moment. Don’t think about your argument you
had with your boss. Don’t think about what you’re going to have for
dinner. If you want to get out of the conversation, get out of the
conversation, but don’t be half in it and half out of it.

2:11

have someone fighting both passionately
for it and against it, it’s not normal.

What does a rapist look like exactly,Beth? Is it a Slavic man wearing a
denim jacket with a patchy beard and the scent of cheap champagne waft
over his blister-pocked lips?

Number two: Don’t pontificate. If you want to state your opinion without
any opportunity for response or argument or pushback or growth, write a
blog.

“I came to realize that conversational competence might be the single
most overlooked skill we fail to teach. Kids spend hours each day
engaging with ideas and each other through screens, but rarely do they
have an opportunity to hone their interpersonal communications skills.
It might sound like a funny question, but we have to ask ourselves: Is
there any 21st-century skill more important than being able to sustain
coherent, confident conversation?”

Pew Research did a study
of 10,000 American adults,

S2

(Laughter)

2:38

and they found that at this moment,
we are more polarized,

Don’t hate the player,hate the game,son.

Now, there’s a really good reason why I don’t allow pundits on my show:
Because they’re really boring. If they’re conservative, they’re going to
hate Obama and food stamps and abortion. If they’re liberal, they’re
going to hate big banks and oil corporations and Dick Cheney. Totally
predictable. And you don’t want to be like that. You need to enter every
conversation assuming that you have something to learn. The famed
therapist M. Scott Peck said that true listening requires a setting
aside of oneself. And sometimes that means setting aside your personal
opinion. He said that sensing this acceptance, the speaker will become
less and less vulnerable and more and more likely to open up the inner
recesses of his or her mind to the listener. Again, assume that you have
something to learn.

Now, I make my living talking to people: Nobel Prize winners, truck
drivers, billionaires, kindergarten teachers, heads of state, plumbers.
I talk to people that I like. I talk to people that I don’t like. I
talk to some people that I disagree with deeply on a personal level. But
I still have a great conversation with them.
So I’d like to spend the
next 10 minutes or so teaching you how to talk and how to listen.

we are more divided,

Take it easy. This is a blessing in disguise.

Bill Nye: “Everyone you will ever meet knows something that you don’t.”
I put it this way: Everybody is an expert in something.

3:03

than we ever have been in history.

Pssh. White-people problems,Morty.

Number three: Use open-ended questions. In this case, take a cue from
journalists. Start your questions with who, what, when, where, why or
how. If you put in a complicated question, you’re going to get a simple
answer out. If I ask you, “Were you terrified?” you’re going to respond
to the most powerful word in that sentence, which is “terrified,” and
the answer is “Yes, I was” or “No, I wasn’t.” “Were you angry?” “Yes, I
was very angry.” Let them describe it. They’re the ones that know. Try
asking them things like, “What was that like?” “How did that feel?”
Because then they might have to stop for a moment and think about it,
and you’re going to get a much more interesting response.

Many of you have already heard a lot of advice on this, things like look
the person in the eye, think of interesting topics to discuss in
advance, look, nod and smile to show that you’re paying attention,
repeat back what you just heard or summarize it. So I want you to forget
all of that. It is crap.

We’re less likely to compromise,

All right,third time’s the charm.

Number four: Go with the flow. That means thoughts will come into your
mind and you need to let them go out of your mind. We’ve heard
interviews often in which a guest is talking for several minutes and
then the host comes back in and asks a question which seems like it
comes out of nowhere, or it’s already been answered. That means the host
probably stopped listening two minutes ago because he thought of this
really clever question, and he was just bound and determined to say
that. And we do the exact same thing. We’re sitting there having a
conversation with someone, and then we remember that time that we met
Hugh Jackman in a coffee shop.

3:23

which means we’re
not listening to each other.

S3

(Laughter)

(Laughter)

And we make decisions about where to live,

So safe,so comfortable,so Shoney’s.

And we stop listening. Stories and ideas are going to come to you. You
need to let them come and let them go.

3:26

who to marry and even
who our friends are going to be,

ghoulish overkill

Number five: If you don’t know, say that you don’t know. Now, people on
the radio, especially on NPR, are much more aware that they’re going on
the record, and so they’re more careful about what they claim to be an
expert in and what they claim to know for sure. Do that. Err on the side
of caution. Talk should not be cheap.

There is no reason to learn how to show you’re paying attention if you
are in fact paying attention.

based on what we already believe.

Yeah,I’d like to get a 10-piece McNugget and a bunch of the Szechuan
sauce. Like,as much as you’re allowed to give me.

Number six: Don’t equate your experience with theirs. If they’re talking
about having lost a family member, don’t start talking about the time
you lost a family member. If they’re talking about the trouble they’re
having at work, don’t tell them about how much you hate your job. It’s
not the same. It is never the same. All experiences are individual. And,
more importantly, it is not about you. You don’t need to take that
moment to prove how amazing you are or how much you’ve suffered.
Somebody asked Stephen Hawking once what his IQ was, and he said, “I
have no idea. People who brag about their IQs are losers.”

3:34

Again, that means
we’re not listening to each other.

I’ll make it up as I go.

(Laughter)

(Laughter)

A conversation requires a balance
between talking and listening,

Oh,there’s not enough room for all my genius,so I’m leaving you with my
fear of wicker furniture,my desire to play the trumpet,my tentative
plans to purchase a hat,and six years of improv workshops. Comedy comes
in threes.

Conversations are not a promotional opportunity.

3:35

and somewhere along the way,
we lost that balance.

Always wait for permission to feel accomplishment.

Number seven: Try not to repeat yourself. It’s condescending, and it’s
really boring, and we tend to do it a lot. Especially in work
conversations or in conversations with our kids, we have a point to
make, so we just keep rephrasing it over and over. Don’t do that.

(Applause)

Now, part of that is due to technology.

Employee of the month,ladies and gentlemen.

Number eight: Stay out of the weeds. Frankly, people don’t care about
the years, the names, the dates, all those details that you’re
struggling to come up with in your mind. They don’t care. What they care
about is you. They care about what you’re like, what you have in common.
So forget the details. Leave them out.

3:38

The smartphones that you all
either have in your hands

Isotope 322. This stuff’s powerful,Morty,it makes Isotope 465 look like
Isotope 317.

Number nine: This is not the last one, but it is the most important one.
Listen. I cannot tell you how many really important people have said
that listening is perhaps the most, the number one most important skill
that you could develop. Buddha said, and I’m paraphrasing, “If your
mouth is open, you’re not learning.” And Calvin Coolidge said, “No man
ever listened his way out of a job.”

Now, I actually use the exact same skills as a professional interviewer
that I do in regular life. So, I’m going to teach you how to interview
people, and that’s actually going to help you learn how to be better
conversationalists. Learn to have a conversation without wasting your
time, without getting bored, and, please God, without offending anybody.

or close enough that you could
grab them really quickly.

Save it for the Semantics Dome,E.B. White.

(Laughter)

3:59

According to Pew Research,

I don’t do magic,Morty,I do science. One takes brains,the other takes
dark eye liner.

Why do we not listen to each other? Number one, we’d rather talk. When
I’m talking, I’m in control. I don’t have to hear anything I’m not
interested in. I’m the center of attention. I can bolster my own
identity. But there’s another reason: We get distracted. The average
person talks at about 225 word per minute, but we can listen at up to
500 words per minute. So our minds are filling in those other 275 words.
And look, I know, it takes effort and energy to actually pay attention
to someone, but if you can’t do that, you’re not in a conversation.
You’re just two people shouting out barely related sentences in the same
place.

We’ve all had really great conversations. We’ve had them before. We know
what it’s like. The kind of conversation where you walk away feeling
engaged and inspired, or where you feel like you’ve made a real
connection or you’ve been perfectly understood.
There is no reason why
most of your interactions can’t be like that.

about a third of American teenagers
send more than a hundred texts a day.

The reason anyone would do this is,if they could,which they can’t,would
be because they could.

(Laughter)

4:17

And many of them, almost most of them,
are more likely to text their friends

-Because I don’t respect therapy,because I’m a scientist. Because I
invent,transform,create,and destroy for a living,and when I don’t like
something about the world,I change it. And I don’t think going to a
rented office in a strip mall to listen to some agent of averageness
explain which words mean which feelings has ever helped anyone do
anything. I think it’s helped a lot of people get comfortable and stop
panicking,which is a state of mind we value in the animals we eat,but
not something I want for myself. I’m not a cow. I’m a pickle — when I
feel like it. So…you asked. -Rick,the only connection between your
unquestionable intelligence and the sickness destroying your family is
that everyone in your family,you included, use intelligence to justify
sickness. You seem to alternate between viewing your own mind as an
unstoppable force and as an inescapable curse. And I think it’s because
the only truly unapproachable concept for you is that it’s your mind
within your control. You chose to come here,you chose to talk to
belittle my vocation,just as you chose to become a pickle. You are the
master of your universe,and yet you are dripping with rat blood and
feces. You enormous mind literally vegetating by your own hand. I have
no doubt that you would be bored senseless by therapy,the same way I’m
bored when I brush my teeth and wipe my ass. Because the thing about
repairing,maintaining,and cleaning is it’s not an adventure. There’s no
way to do it so wrong you might die. It’s just work. And the bottom line
is,some people are okay going to work,and some people…well,some people
would rather die. Each of us gets to choose.

You have to listen to one another. Stephen Covey said it very
beautifully. He said, “Most of us don’t listen with the intent to
understand. We listen with the intent to reply.”

So I have 10 basic rules. I’m going to walk you through all of them, but
honestly, if you just choose one of them and master it, you’ll already
enjoy better conversations.

than they are to talk
to them face to face.

So,to be clear,I sometimes reference the geopolitical complexities of
the topic which is not the same as going to an anti-Semitic place.

One more rule, number 10, and it’s this one: Be brief.

4:26

There’s this great piece in The Atlantic.

But there comes a time in every man’s life when he must choose the
foundation on which his legacy will be built. One of compromise or one
of blood.

[A good conversation is like a miniskirt; short enough to retain
interest, but long enough to cover the subject. — My Sister]

Number one: Don’t multitask. And I don’t mean just set down your cell
phone or your tablet or your car keys or whatever is in your hand. I
mean, be present. Be in that moment. Don’t think about your argument you
had with your boss. Don’t think about what you’re going to have for
dinner. If you want to get out of the conversation, get out of the
conversation, but don’t be half in it and half out of it.

It was written by a high school teacher
named Paul Barnwell.

-No,because I need a living organism coated in gibble snake bile to
attract a shmooglite runner. -Wait,what’s happening? -Use that
confusion,Jerry. It will make you wriggle more like an abandoned
newborn.

(Laughter)

4:49

And he gave his kids
a communication project.

Cosmic apotheosis wears off faster than salvia.

(Applause) All of this boils down to the same basic concept, and it is
this one: Be interested in other people.

Number two: Don’t pontificate. If you want to state your opinion without
any opportunity for response or argument or pushback or growth, write a
blog.

He wanted to teach them how to speak
on a specific subject without using notes.

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You know, I grew up with a very famous grandfather, and there was kind
of a ritual in my home. People would come over to talk to my
grandparents, and after they would leave, my mother would come over to
us, and she’d say, “Do you know who that was? She was the runner-up to
Miss America. He was the mayor of Sacramento. She won a Pulitzer Prize.
He’s a Russian ballet dancer.” And I kind of grew up assuming everyone
has some hidden, amazing thing about them. And honestly, I think it’s
what makes me a better host. I keep my mouth shut as often as I possibly
can, I keep my mind open, and I’m always prepared to be amazed, and I’m
never disappointed.

5:01

And he said this: “I came to realize…”

You do the same thing. Go out, talk to people, listen to people, and,
most importantly, be prepared to be amazed.

(Laughter)

(Laughter)

Thanks.

5:04

“I came to realize
that conversational competence

Now, there’s a really good reason why I don’t allow pundits on my show:
Because they’re really boring. If they’re conservative, they’re going to
hate Obama and food stamps and abortion. If they’re liberal, they’re
going to hate big banks and oil corporations and Dick Cheney. Totally
predictable. And you don’t want to be like that. You need to enter every
conversation assuming that you have something to learn. The famed
therapist M. Scott Peck said that true listening requires a setting
aside of oneself. And sometimes that means setting aside your personal
opinion. He said that sensing this acceptance, the speaker will become
less and less vulnerable and more and more likely to open up the inner
recesses of his or her mind to the listener. Again, assume that you have
something to learn.

might be the single
most overlooked skill we fail to teach.

5:51

Kids spend hours each day engaging
with ideas and each other through screens,

Bill Nye: “Everyone you will ever meet knows something that you don’t.”
I put it this way: Everybody is an expert in something.

but rarely do they have an opportunity

6:02

to hone their interpersonal
communications skills.

Number three: Use open-ended questions. In this case, take a cue from
journalists. Start your questions with who, what, when, where, why or
how. If you put in a complicated question, you’re going to get a simple
answer out. If I ask you, “Were you terrified?” you’re going to respond
to the most powerful word in that sentence, which is “terrified,” and
the answer is “Yes, I was” or “No, I wasn’t.” “Were you angry?” “Yes, I
was very angry.” Let them describe it. They’re the ones that know. Try
asking them things like, “What was that like?” “How did that feel?”
Because then they might have to stop for a moment and think about it,
and you’re going to get a much more interesting response.

It might sound like a funny question,
but we have to ask ourselves:

6:39

Is there any 21st-century skill

Number four: Go with the flow. That means thoughts will come into your
mind and you need to let them go out of your mind. We’ve heard
interviews often in which a guest is talking for several minutes and
then the host comes back in and asks a question which seems like it
comes out of nowhere, or it’s already been answered. That means the host
probably stopped listening two minutes ago because he thought of this
really clever question, and he was just bound and determined to say
that. And we do the exact same thing. We’re sitting there having a
conversation with someone, and then we remember that time that we met
Hugh Jackman in a coffee shop.

more important than being able to sustain
coherent, confident conversation?”

7:16

Now, I make my living talking to people:

(Laughter)

Nobel Prize winners, truck drivers,

7:17

billionaires, kindergarten teachers,

And we stop listening. Stories and ideas are going to come to you. You
need to let them come and let them go.

heads of state, plumbers.

7:25

I talk to people that I like.
I talk to people that I don’t like.

Number five: If you don’t know, say that you don’t know. Now, people on
the radio, especially on NPR, are much more aware that they’re going on
the record, and so they’re more careful about what they claim to be an
expert in and what they claim to know for sure. Do that. Err on the side
of caution. Talk should not be cheap.

I talk to some people that I disagree with
deeply on a personal level.

7:45

But I still have
a great conversation with them.

Number six: Don’t equate your experience with theirs. If they’re talking
about having lost a family member, don’t start talking about the time
you lost a family member. If they’re talking about the trouble they’re
having at work, don’t tell them about how much you hate your job. It’s
not the same. It is never the same. All experiences are individual.
And, more importantly, it is not about you. You don’t need to take
that moment to prove how amazing you are or how much you’ve suffered.

Somebody asked Stephen Hawking once what his IQ was, and he said, “I
have no idea. People who brag about their IQs are losers.”

So I’d like to spend the next 10 minutes
or so teaching you how to talk

8:20

and how to listen.

(Laughter)

Many of you have already heard
a lot of advice on this,

8:22

things like look the person in the eye,

Conversations are not a promotional opportunity.

think of interesting topics
to discuss in advance,

8:27

look, nod and smile to show
that you’re paying attention,

Number seven: Try not to repeat yourself. It’s condescending, and it’s
really boring, and we tend to do it a lot. Especially in work
conversations or in conversations with our kids, we have a point to
make, so we just keep rephrasing it over and over. Don’t do that.

repeat back what you just heard
or summarize it.

8:45

So I want you to forget all of that.

Number eight: Stay out of the weeds. Frankly, people don’t care about
the years, the names, the dates, all those details that you’re
struggling to come up with in your mind. They don’t care. What they care
about is you. They care about what you’re like, what you have in common.
So forget the details. Leave them out.

It is crap.

9:07

(Laughter)

Number nine: This is not the last one, but it is the most important one.
Listen. I cannot tell you how many really important people have said
that listening is perhaps the most, the number one most important skill
that you could develop. Buddha said, and I’m paraphrasing, “If your
mouth is open, you’re not learning.
” And Calvin Coolidge said, “No man
ever listened his way out of a job.”

There is no reason to learn
how to show you’re paying attention

9:31

if you are in fact paying attention.

(Laughter)

(Laughter)

9:33

(Applause)

Why do we not listen to each other? Number one, we’d rather talk. When
I’m talking, I’m in control. I don’t have to hear anything I’m not
interested in. I’m the center of attention. I can bolster my own
identity
. But there’s another reason: We get distracted. The average
person talks at about 225 word per minute, but we can listen at up to
500 words per minute. So our minds are filling in those other 275 words.
And look, I know, it takes effort and energy to actually pay attention
to someone, but if you can’t do that, you’re not in a conversation.
You’re just two people shouting out barely related sentences in the same
place.

Now, I actually use the exact
永利电玩城 ,same skills as a professional interviewer

10:13

that I do in regular life.

(Laughter)

So, I’m going to teach you
how to interview people,

10:15

and that’s actually going to help you
learn how to be better conversationalists.

You have to listen to one another. Stephen Covey said it very
beautifully. He said, “Most of us don’t listen with the intent to
understand. We listen with the intent to reply.”

Learn to have a conversation

10:27

without wasting your time,
without getting bored,

One more rule, number 10, and it’s this one: Be brief.

and, please God,
without offending anybody.

10:31

We’ve all had really great conversations.

[A good conversation is like a miniskirt; short enough to retain
interest, but long enough to cover the subject.
— My Sister]

We’ve had them before.
We know what it’s like.

10:37

The kind of conversation where you
walk away feeling engaged and inspired,

(Laughter)

or where you feel
like you’ve made a real connection

10:39

or you’ve been perfectly understood.

(Applause) All of this boils down to the same basic concept, and it is
this one: Be interested in other people.

There is no reason

10:49

why most of your interactions
can’t be like that.

You know, I grew up with a very famous grandfather, and there was kind
of a ritual in my home. People would come over to talk to my
grandparents, and after they would leave, my mother would come over to
us, and she’d say, “Do you know who that was? She was the runner-up to
Miss America. He was the mayor of Sacramento. She won a Pulitzer Prize.
He’s a Russian ballet dancer.” And I kind of grew up assuming everyone
has some hidden, amazing thing about them. And honestly, I think it’s
what makes me a better host. 

So I have 10 basic rules.
I’m going to walk you through all of them,

I keep my mouth shut as often as I possibly can, I keep my mind open, and I’m always prepared to be amazed, and I’m never disappointed.

11:27

You do the same thing. Go out, talk to people, listen to people, and,
most importantly, be prepared to be amazed.

11:37

Thanks.

11:38

(Applause)

but honestly, if you just choose
one of them and master it,

you’ll already enjoy better conversations.

Number one: Don’t multitask.

And I don’t mean
just set down your cell phone

or your tablet or your car keys
or whatever is in your hand.

I mean, be present.

Be in that moment.

Don’t think about your argument
you had with your boss.

Don’t think about what
you’re going to have for dinner.

If you want to get out
of the conversation,

get out of the conversation,

but don’t be half in it
and half out of it.

Number two: Don’t pontificate.

If you want to state your opinion

without any opportunity for response
or argument or pushback or growth,

write a blog.

(Laughter)

2017年08月15日20:45:47

Now, there’s a really good reason
why I don’t allow pundits on my show:

Because they’re really boring.

If they’re conservative, they’re going to
hate Obama and food stamps and abortion.

If they’re liberal, they’re going to hate

big banks and oil corporations
and Dick Cheney.

Totally predictable.

And you don’t want to be like that.

You need to enter every conversation
assuming that you have something to learn.

The famed therapist M. Scott Peck said

that true listening requires
a setting aside of oneself.

And sometimes that means
setting aside your personal opinion.

He said that sensing this acceptance,

the speaker will become
less and less vulnerable

and more and more likely
to open up the inner recesses

of his or her mind to the listener.

Again, assume that you have
something to learn.

Bill Nye: “Everyone you will ever meet
knows something that you don’t.”

I put it this way:

Everybody is an expert in something.

Number three: Use open-ended questions.

In this case, take a cue from journalists.

Start your questions with who,
what, when, where, why or how.

If you put in a complicated question,
you’re going to get a simple answer out.

If I ask you, “Were you terrified?”

you’re going to respond to the most
powerful word in that sentence,

which is “terrified,” and the answer is
“Yes, I was” or “No, I wasn’t.”

“Were you angry?” “Yes, I was very angry.”

Let them describe it.
They’re the ones that know.

Try asking them things like,
“What was that like?”

“How did that feel?”

Because then they might have to stop
for a moment and think about it,

and you’re going to get
a much more interesting response.

Number four: Go with the flow.

That means thoughts
will come into your mind

and you need to let them
go out of your mind.

We’ve heard interviews often

in which a guest is talking
for several minutes

and then the host comes back in
and asks a question

which seems like it comes out of nowhere,
or it’s already been answered.

That means the host probably
stopped listening two minutes ago

because he thought
of this really clever question,

and he was just bound
and determined to say that.

And we do the exact same thing.

We’re sitting there having
a conversation with someone,

and then we remember that time
that we met Hugh Jackman in a coffee shop.

(Laughter)

And we stop listening.

Stories and ideas
are going to come to you.

You need to let them come and let them go.

Number five: If you don’t know,
say that you don’t know.

Now, people on the radio,
especially on NPR,

are much more aware
that they’re going on the record,

and so they’re more careful
about what they claim to be an expert in

and what they claim to know for sure.

Do that. Err on the side of caution.

Talk should not be cheap.

Number six: Don’t equate
your experience with theirs.

If they’re talking
about having lost a family member,

don’t start talking about the time
you lost a family member.

If they’re talking about the trouble
they’re having at work,

don’t tell them about
how much you hate your job.

It’s not the same. It is never the same.

All experiences are individual.

And, more importantly,
it is not about you.

You don’t need to take that moment
to prove how amazing you are

or how much you’ve suffered.

Somebody asked Stephen Hawking once
what his IQ was, and he said,

“I have no idea. People who brag
about their IQs are losers.”

(Laughter)

Conversations are not
a promotional opportunity.

Number seven:

Try not to repeat yourself.

It’s condescending,
and it’s really boring,

and we tend to do it a lot.

Especially in work conversations
or in conversations with our kids,

we have a point to make,

so we just keep rephrasing it
over and over.

Don’t do that.

Number eight: Stay out of the weeds.

Frankly, people don’t care

about the years, the names,

the dates, all those details

that you’re struggling
to come up with in your mind.

They don’t care.
What they care about is you.

They care about what you’re like,

what you have in common.

So forget the details. Leave them out.

Number nine:

This is not the last one,
but it is the most important one.

Listen.

I cannot tell you how many
really important people have said

that listening is perhaps the most,
the number one most important skill

that you could develop.

Buddha said, and I’m paraphrasing,

“If your mouth is open,
you’re not learning.”

And Calvin Coolidge said, “No man
ever listened his way out of a job.”

(Laughter)

Why do we not listen to each other?

Number one, we’d rather talk.

When I’m talking, I’m in control.

I don’t have to hear anything
I’m not interested in.

I’m the center of attention.

I can bolster my own identity.

But there’s another reason:

We get distracted.

The average person talks
at about 225 word per minute,

but we can listen at up to
500 words per minute.

So our minds are filling in
those other 275 words.

And look, I know,
it takes effort and energy

to actually pay attention to someone,

but if you can’t do that,
you’re not in a conversation.

You’re just two people shouting out
barely related sentences

in the same place.

(Laughter)

You have to listen to one another.

Stephen Covey said it very beautifully.

He said, “Most of us don’t listen
with the intent to understand.

We listen with the intent to reply.”

One more rule, number 10,
and it’s this one: Be brief.

[A good conversation is like a miniskirt;
short enough to retain interest,

but long enough to cover
the subject. — My Sister]

(Laughter)

(Applause)

All of this boils down to the same
basic concept, and it is this one:

Be interested in other people.

You know, I grew up
with a very famous grandfather,

and there was kind of a ritual in my home.

People would come over
to talk to my grandparents,

and after they would leave,
my mother would come over to us,

and she’d say, “Do you know who that was?

She was the runner-up to Miss America.

He was the mayor of Sacramento.

She won a Pulitzer Prize.
He’s a Russian ballet dancer.”

And I kind of grew up assuming

everyone has some hidden,
amazing thing about them.

And honestly, I think
it’s what makes me a better host.

I keep my mouth shut
as often as I possibly can,

I keep my mind open,

and I’m always prepared to be amazed,

and I’m never disappointed.

You do the same thing.

Go out, talk to people,

listen to people,

and, most importantly,
be prepared to be amazed.

Thanks.

(Applause)

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